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Supermarket Food in Japan

4 6,010
Tokyo Supermarket
Plenty of bread for those who want a break from instant ramen

It has been 3 weeks since the earthquake in North Japan. Whilst supplies are no doubt in short supply in the areas hit hardest by the earthquake we can see some footage on television of evacuation centers receiving goods and how grateful people are just to get the basics delivered.

Their was a slight shortage of some supplies in Tokyo immediately following the earthquake, but things are quickly returning to normal. The photos I took today at a supermarket were taken about 1pm, so the store had already been open for quite a while. As you can see the stocks are returning to the shelves in force.

Bread, bread, bread
Bread, bread, bread
Lots of different bread brands at differing prices
Lots of different bread brands at differing prices
The milk is lined up and ready to go
The milk is lined up and ready to go
Not that much water to be seen, but lots of great alternatives. I am a pocari sweat fan!
Not that much water to be seen, but lots of great alternatives. I am a pocari sweat fan!
A few limits on buying up drinks in bulk. Good idea until people start to realize supplies are available as normal
A few limits on buying up drinks in bulk. Good idea until people start to realize supplies are available as normal
Lots of choice here
Lots of choice here
Rice in quantity and quality
Rice in quantity and quality
Instant ramen is making its way back to normal supplies
Instant ramen is making its way back to normal supplies
Some frozen produce
Some frozen produce
Eggs a plenty
Eggs a plenty
Umeboshi and other goodies
Umeboshi and other goodies
I saw on the news that natto was in short supply, causing some concerns. Are you a natto fan?
I saw on the news that natto was in short supply, causing some concerns. Are you a natto fan?
Plenty of fruit available here
Plenty of fruit available here
Tomatoes ready for the picking
Tomatoes ready for the picking
Mushrooms and more
Mushrooms and more
These look really nice
These look really nice
Fish going cheap at 98 Yen, that is about $1
Fish going cheap at 98 Yen, that is about $1
Food piled high here
Food piled high here
The healthy stuff keeps coming
The healthy stuff keeps coming
Toilet paper back in stock
Toilet paper back in stock
Nappies been missing from the shelves are now back
Nappies been missing from the shelves are now back
More rice available here. Buy it by the sack load
More rice available here. Buy it by the sack load

It is good to see things slowly getting back to normal in Tokyo. It is not that far from the earthquake damaged areas to the North, but was lucky to escape any serious large scale problems. Hopefully, people and businesses in Tokyo can focus on their work but also provide some assistance to those not so fortunate in the Tohoku region.

  1. Orchid64 says

    Your shelves are rather less picked over than ours. Things are definitely filling out better than they have in the last several weeks, but milk is quite sparse, and yogurt is entirely absent (at least plain yogurt). Bottled water is in short supply as well, but there is still a little around. I’m not complaining or anything, but I’ve found that availability is rather regional and unpredictable. I think the dairy shortage is due to supply side issues rather than panic buying, though the fact that limits have been put on such products stops people from hoarding what little there is.

    1. Shibuya246 says

      very true. This is just a picture of 1 supermarket and not not representative of everywhere. I was surprised on tv the newscaster was worried about the lack of natto in the supermarkets. Cant live without natto ! I heard the dairy shortage was due to there being 6 main packaging plants, 3 of which were in the affected Tohoku area. Apparently, the milk was flowing but the cartons to pack them were not getting produced.

  2. perdomot says

    I wish they had this in the US

  3. Exiv96 says

    I see many prices ending in 8 in this supermarket. Just like elsewhere in the world, they round down their prices, but it seems unusual because I’m so used to see “typically japanese” prices like 147 or 189 yen in conbinis where they just apply the MSRP + 5% tax.

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