Tokyo Photo Walk 2

 
Nice contrasts of the dark shadows over the bridge to the sunlight on these apartments. Also, the feel of a coolish winter day in the shade with the cyclist and children walking

Nice contrasts of the dark shadows over the bridge to the sunlight on these apartments. Also, the feel of a coolish winter day in the shade with the cyclist and children walking

It was a great sunny day on “Sunday” with blue skies in Tokyo and I decided to take a walk from Shinagawa Station towards Tennozu Isle (where the monorail runs to Haneda Airport).

A look across the water to the T.Y Brewery and restaurant.

A look across the water to the T.Y Brewery and restaurant.

Bright pink bus taking people to the Aeon Jusco store at Shinagawa Seaside.

Bright pink bus taking people to the Aeon Jusco store at Shinagawa Seaside.

You can see the Rakusuibashi with its lime green color as well as an interesting mix of buildings in the background. Some old, some new, some apartments, some business.

You can see the Rakusuibashi with its lime green color as well as an interesting mix of buildings in the background. Some old, some new, some apartments, some business.

Very colorful manhole cover courtesy of the fire department.

Very colorful manhole cover courtesy of the fire department.

Looking South towards Haneda and Yokohama.

Looking South towards Haneda and Yokohama.

T.Y. Harbor Brewery. A great place to eat and drink.

T.Y. Harbor Brewery. A great place to eat and drink.

The equipment on the barge had some really bright colors. The contrast of the rusty looking barge was great.

The equipment on the barge had some really bright colors. The contrast of the rusty looking barge was great.

Buildings crowded in on either side of the water.

Buildings crowded in on either side of the water.

These steel pipes with concrete wheels were in the water. I am not sure what they were used for, but they shone well in the sunlight when I took this photo. The water took on a very deep blue color and the reflection of the building in the top right was fantastic.

These steel pipes with concrete wheels were in the water. I am not sure what they were used for, but they shone well in the sunlight when I took this photo. The water took on a very deep blue color and the reflection of the building in the top right was fantastic.

Another look at the steel and concrete objects in the water. I couldn't lean far enough over the rail to get the exact view I wanted. Kept thinking I was going to drop the camera in the water.

Another look at the steel and concrete objects in the water. I couldn't lean far enough over the rail to get the exact view I wanted. Kept thinking I was going to drop the camera in the water.

Lots of people out walking their dogs in this area. If you have a dog in Japan you can expect complete strangers to come up and be very friendly talking to you. It is probably one of the best ways to get to know people in your neighborhood. A great conversation opener.

Lots of people out walking their dogs in this area. If you have a dog in Japan you can expect complete strangers to come up and be very friendly talking to you. It is probably one of the best ways to get to know people in your neighborhood. A great conversation opener.

Liked these wavy lines in the park next to the water. Very warm and inviting.

Liked these wavy lines in the park next to the water. Very warm and inviting.

Some colorful boats tethered to the barge, ready for some time of work in the area.

Some colorful boats tethered to the barge, ready for some time of work in the area.

Colorful outfits on these dogs helping them to keep warm.

Colorful outfits on these dogs helping them to keep warm.

The Fureai Bridge, about to cross over from Shinagawa to Tennozu Isle.

The Fureai Bridge, about to cross over from Shinagawa to Tennozu Isle.

The baseball game just about to finish up, both teams say thanks to the coaches and umpires.

The baseball game just about to finish up, both teams say thanks to the coaches and umpires.

North, South, East or West.

North, South, East or West.

The gates open here to let boats in, but can be shut in case of flood or tidal warnings to protect the inner waterways of Tokyo.

The gates open here to let boats in, but can be shut in case of flood or tidal warnings to protect the inner waterways of Tokyo.

Not a big fan of this architecture at the Shinagawa City Towers building. This complex is quite new, but is far from the station.

Not a big fan of this architecture at the Shinagawa City Towers building. This complex is quite new, but is far from the station.

Bird of Shinagawa-ku, Yurikamome.

Bird of Shinagawa-ku, Yurikamome.

The Fureai Bridge. We have now crossed to Tennozu Isle.

The Fureai Bridge. We have now crossed to Tennozu Isle.

The address post outside the T.Y. Brewery. In Japan addresses normally are stated in blocks of land. This address is in the Shinagawa Ward (Shinagawa-ku) and is East Shinagawa, 2-chome, 1-ban

The address post outside the T.Y. Brewery. In Japan addresses normally are stated in blocks of land. This address is in the Shinagawa Ward (Shinagawa-ku) and is East Shinagawa, 2-chome, 1-ban

Restaurant and Floating Bar at the T.Y. Brewery, Tennozu Isle.

Restaurant and Floating Bar at the T.Y. Brewery, Tennozu Isle.

Looking back towards Shinagawa from Tennozu Isle, you can see the main SONY building.

Looking back towards Shinagawa from Tennozu Isle, you can see the main SONY building.

Feel free to use the “comments on top of the photos” feature if you want to highlight something for others to see. Any comments you make on the photo itself will also appear in the comments section at the bottom of the page. I will also make a series of notes on top of the photo, but they will just be viewable on the photo, not in the comments section.

Through the Tokyo Photo Walk series I plan to venture out and discover new areas of town in 2010. I am going to call the recent walk through Gotenyama, the first in the series and this one is then number 2. By the end of the year hopefully we can have a number of interesting walks together to look back on.

Rather than picking the well known famous spots, I am planning to just take photos of the places I go to and show you what I am viewing. Sometimes that might mean you get to see a landmark like Tokyo Tower or Ginza main street, other times it might be the back roads of town somewhere. Hope you enjoy ^_^.

What is your favorite Tokyo walking area?

38 thoughts on “Tokyo Photo Walk 2”

  1. shibuya246 says:

    Aeon Shopping Center

  2. shibuya246 says:

    This is the JAL building

  3. shibuya246 says:

    I think this is the NEC building.

  4. santa says:

    Very nice picture!!.. I like it! thanks for sharing

  5. rob7138 says:

    Another great set of pics. The first pic and the pic of the Fureai Bridge would look incredible in b&w also.

    1. shibuya246 says:

      very good point. I might take a look at that on my monitor, although taking the color out after never gives as good as effect if you shoot in black and white to begin with. I need to look into the benefits and techniques for shooting in RAW and give that a go. I have never been very fond of altering the pictures afterwards, apart from of course cropping and the odd straightening ^^.

      1. Ady says:

        I was of the same thought of a school for a good two years. RAW just seemed like waste of memory. Moreover it felt like lying to myself.
        I honestly recommend you give it a try. Get yourself a free beta copy of Adobe Lightroom 3 and give it a go.
        JPEG is nothing but an approximation of what the camera really saw at that moment. RAW gives you complete flexibility to make the picture look the way you want it to look.

        I’ll show you an example. Its not the best but will give you a fair idea.
        http://adysan.posterous.com/why-raw

        1. shibuya246 says:

          very very nice 🙂 Thanks

          1. lithiumangel says:

            No offense Ady, but the original shot just wasn’t shot with the proper metering mode and thus you didn’t get the correct overal exposure to preserve the colours. Ramping them up in LR; you did get the color back, but you incurred heavy “noise” in the process (and LR has _incredibly_ poor de-noise algorithms)

            Your assumption that JPEG is an approximation of what you shot is wrong (simple indication is that you can never “post process” a different metering mode), a camera will always shoot a RAW image. It will them, inmeadetly apply the desired user settings in terms of color space, color, tone,hue etc. etc. etc. and save on card to JPEG with the desired compression level. That’s what happens if you shoot in JPEG. If you shoot raw, no compression is applied, retaining either 12, or in Alan’s D700’s case 14 bits of color information (instead of JPEG’s 8 !) and doesnt apply the user’s post processing in the file’; however ! A tiny preview JPEG is made inside the raw file representing the user’s current camera settings. But since that’s not the actual raw, you can still manipulate settings such as hue etc.
            Which brings me to the next case. There are mainly two reasons why you should be shooting raw.

            1. To configure your custom image settings – Shoot pictures in raw format of common scenes. In alan’s case this would be “Tokyo urban enviroment” “Tokyo street candid portraits (of ppl)” and post process to get the image looking how he wants to further on the computer using Nikon’s propierty Capture NX raw processing software. (reason later) Now that he found the ideal settings to represent his pictures he can use the export settings feature to store these settings in his D700’s configurable memory banks (Nikon pro camera feature) Thus. Next time when Alan goes out shooting either 2 example scenario’s he will switch to the desired profile and get BAM instant win pictures out of them; without bothering to tinker the RAW’s – again.

            *To do this you need your camera manufacturer’s own raw processing software. Because it uses the same settings as your camera and is interchangable. Using LR is a really bad idea from the start. Why ? Because it cannot replicate the color a Nikon or Canon camera produces out of the box; as you notice when you load a raw in Adobe LR. It will first look fine, the way you shot it. Then all of the sudden after 2 seconds turn very dull in color most of the times. This is cause LR first reads the aforementioned JPEG preview inside the RAW. Before updating it. See. The way color is read in Nikon or Canon’s color profiles is something of a trademark; thus Adobe has to approximate roughly, and thus LR interpretates the colors differently. So it is effectivly a waste of time trying to first “Get back” the colors as they were, and then enhancing them.
            Hence again; use propierty software – yes i know. LR is very handy for sorting pics but you can just adjust your workflow to suit.

            The second most obvious use of raw’s is to still have the ability to adjust for unforseen circumstances. When you are shooting pictures for unique moments, or for your job. I.E you cannot mess it up, and you are taking a safer bet with shooting raw to still be able to get something else out of your pictures if; despite your precautions of using memory banks; it still ends up not desirable to bad conditions, or you being forgetfull with the settings.

            Think. Wedding photographer, club/event photographer, or shooting pictures on a vacation your not likely taking again in the next few years (for most people here, this would be Japan 🙂

            There is a third reason. If you *really* need the utmost highest image quality for delicate printwork or magazine cover work. You’d want the RAW’s ability of 14 bit colors and convert it to TIFF before printing/mastering. This is especially good for FX (Full Frame) sensor camera’s like D700,D3,D3S,D3X on the Nikon side of things. Also brings out more dynamic range this way. But that’s another story.

            IN SHORT. Best practices of RAW images. AVOID post processing work. You want to aim to produce the desired images directly from camera.Use RAW as a guide tool to adjust your memory banks to your preference, and then use them to adapt to each situation. Should it be absolutely needed for shots that are critical, shoot raw’s to adjust slightly back home in Post Processing when your results differ slightly from what you expected.

            The above is propably going to look messy; the current comment system doesnt like enter/new lines for formatting ^_^:
            Alan: If you ever want to dabble with RAW, I can set up a screencast for you (if you use Skype that is, damn handy screen-sharing function) sometime and I can explain the workflow. It’s easier than it sounds.

            1. shibuya246 says:

              Some good points here. Lots to think about. I tried RAW once, but didn’t like the results. I tried Nikon’s software but didn’t like that much either. Prefer to let the camera process a JPEG at the time of shooting and if its not the image I want, check the display and then take another. The main thing I change on the camera is to adjust the WB if the image is too dark or too light. I also have been playing more with the aperture setting lately as well to work the fast lenses down at the f/1.4 level 🙂

              I might have another look at the NX Capture software but retouching specific parts of the photo after it has been taken doesn’t really interest me.

              1. lithiumangel says:

                Nikon’s capture NX is kind of hard to like, it is a slow app, with not that great an interface ^_^;
                http://www.capturenx.com/en/lessons/lessons/index.html ; Some online flash videos on Nikon’s site explaining how to use NX 😛 – Mostly what you can try to do with NX is get better colors from your images consistantly with a new profile, but your colors look fine 98% of the time so – Eh . For you there’s no real need 🙂 Especially with the amount of pictures you take.

                1. shibuya246 says:

                  Thanks for the link anyway. Will take a look.

    2. shibuya246 says:

      [img]http://shibuya246.com/wp-content/upload/DSC_0027.JPG[/img]
      [img]http://shibuya246.com/wp-content/upload/DSC_0073-1.JPG[/img]

      1. rob7138 says:

        Very nice.

  6. shibuya246 says:

    Just realized is this concrete or is it wood?

  7. shibuya246 says:

    This looks like they are trying to keep the light out with “sudare” or is it just cardbox boxes?

  8. Exiv96 says:

    Quite unusual to see a Fleur-de-Lys on a japanese sidewalk !

  9. Exiv96 says:

    Now I know why the Yurikamome automated train line has a black-headed bird as a mascot !

    1. shibuya246 says:

      very good. I hadn’t realized they had the mark on the train. When I am next near the train I will try and get a photo to complete the loop 🙂 Thanks

  10. Andrea Watt says:

    I loved your walk, wish I was there. I particularly liked seeing a glimpse of the NEC building. My late father travelled to Japan many times as an employee of NEC. That was when my love of Japan was born.

    1. shibuya246 says:

      Thanks. I used to work in a tall building near there and would look out at the NEC building often. It’s great how landmarks can bring back memories 🙂

  11. whipcracker says:

    People are out early. Maybe he was on his way to work?

  12. whipcracker says:

    I think you showed us pics of this place before, if I recall.

    1. shibuya246 says:

      Probably this shot I took with the 300mm lens of the Shinagawa Birds. http://shibuya246.com/2009/11/22/shinagawa-birds/ Now we know what is down there 🙂

  13. whipcracker says:

    RT @tweetmeme Tokyo Photo Walk 2, Japan Tokyo Photo Walk | Shibuya246 http://bit.ly/5Wpjo6 Look forward to many memorable photo shoots. Will hopefully get to know all the areas around you.
    Take care
    And have a great week. 🙂

  14. HELLOSHEENA says:

    The puppies were adorable!

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